Greg L. Bahnsen New eBook Relase The Man Atheists Feared the Most Life

Greg L. Bahnsen New eBook Relase The Man Atheists Feared the Most Life

August 28, 2016 (datsyn.com) – Over twenty years after his death, Greg L. Bahnsen continues to inspire and fascinate countless Christians. His legacy remains vital and wide-ranging. He was a towering intellectual figure, a popular apologetics lecturer and writer who galvanized a comprehensive movement around the work of Cornelius Van Til. In “Greg Bahnsen-The Man Atheists Feared the Most Life,” Mike Robinson, prolific author and respected apologist at Applied Presuppositional Press, paints a preliminary portrait of the life of Bahnsen.

This is the true story of Greg Bahnsen—one of the greatest apologists of the twentieth century – whose books for scholars and non-specialists have become much-sought theological benchmarks.

Bahnsen exhibited a genius for argumentation and debate from his earliest years. Brought up in a Christian household, Bahnsen never wavered from his faith and scripture subsequently guided all his writings. He became a vigorous champion of the Christian faith through classics such as “Van Til’s Apologetic” and through his many debate victories.

Robinson’s portrayal is of a powerful thinker who became a stirring, though brainy, warrior for our times. You won’t want to miss this fascinating depiction of a creative genius who inspired numerous scholars and apologists.

Over twenty years after his death, Greg L. Bahnsen continues to inspire and fascinate countless Christians. His legacy remains vital and wide-ranging. He was a towering intellectual figure, a popular apologetics lecturer and writer who galvanized a comprehensive movement around the work of Cornelius Van Til. In “Greg Bahnsen―The Man Atheists Feared the Most Life,” Mike Robinson, prolific author and respected apologist at Applied Presuppositional Press, paints a preliminary portrait of the life of Bahnsen.

This is the true story of Greg Bahnsen—one of the greatest apologists of the twentieth century – whose books for scholars and non-specialists have become much-sought theological benchmarks.

Bahnsen exhibited a genius for argumentation and debate from his earliest years. Brought up in a Christian household, Bahnsen never wavered from his faith and scripture subsequently guided all his writings. He became a vigorous champion of the Christian faith through classics such as “Van Til’s Apologetic” and through his many debate victories.

Robinson’s portrayal is of a powerful thinker who became a stirring, though brainy, warrior for our times. You won’t want to miss this fascinating depiction of a creative genius who inspired numerous scholars and apologists.

Robinson is not intimidated by Bahnsen nor overly critical of him; but he shows him a professional respect that ought to silence those who dismiss Bahnsen as a theological rogue. He points out that under its clothing of reasoned argument, Bahnsen’ theology is founded on scripture. A powerful achievement.

Robinson is not intimidated by Bahnsen nor overly critical of him; but he shows him a professional respect that ought to silence those who dismiss Bahnsen as a theological amateur. He points out that under its clothing of reasoned argument, Bahnsen’ theology is founded on a profoundly aesthetic effort: to draw us a picture of the Christian universe and our place in it that moves, attracts and persuades us, so that we say: yes, this is what life is really like, and how much more real it is than we ever imagined. A powerful achievement.

To the question of whether the world really needs another biography of Greg bahnsen, McGrath’s lucid and unsentimental portrait of the Christian champion responds with a resounding “yes.” The year 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of Bahnsen’s death, and times have changed and evangelical sentiments have matured. McGrath offers a new and at times shocking look into the complicated life of this complex figure, in a deeply researched biography.

The author takes us headlong into the heart of a Bahnsen we’ve known little about: his unconventional affair with Mrs. Jane Moore; his hostile and deceptive relationship with his father; his curiosity about the sensuality of cruelty. McGrath navigates the reader through these messy themes, ultimately landing us onto the solid ground of Bahnsen’s postconversion legacy. He shows with skill, sympathy, dispassion, and engaging prose that Bahnsen, like the rest of us, did the best he could with the hand he was dealt. But he got over it, as must all those who would prefer a Bahnsen without shadows. (Publishers Weekly)

McGrath does this so limpidly, so intelligently, and so sympathetically that this biography is the one Bahnsen’ admirers―especially those who, like him, believe that books are to be read and enjoyed―should prefer to all others. (Booklist) A thoroughly researched yet very readable, chronological account of Greg bahnsen’ life, his literature, and his journey from atheism to Christianity. Fifty years after his death, the words of Bahnsen continue to inspire many, and McGrath’s biography may help to unravel some of the mystery behind his eccentric mind. Staff Pick (ForeWord Reviews)

How might Greg bahnsen, the greatest Christian apologist of the twentieth century, respond to the twenty-first century ‘new atheism’ of Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens and company? Might Bahnsen’ own journey from atheism to Christian belief illuminate and undercut the objections of the new atheists? Christian philosopher Peter S. Williams takes us on an intellectual journey through Bahnsen’ conversion in conversation with today’s anti-theists.

Source: Articles